Lore at BYU 2018

Sometimes the truth is more frightening than fiction. Join storyteller Aaron Mahnke and musical guest Chad Lawson for an unforgettable evening of dark, spine-tingling tales – the perfect way to celebrate All Hallows’ Eve. Lore is an award-winning, critically-acclaimed podcast that exposes the darker side of history, exploring the people, places, and things we fear the most.

de Jong Concert Hall

Wednesday, October 31, 7:30 pm

https://arts.byu.edu/2018/10/lore-brings-real-world-horror-stories-to-byu-this-halloween/

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Department News 10-15-18

Every year, our colleagues in arts production breathe a collective sigh of relief the week after Homecoming.  Many of those in arts production focus their efforts on producing one of the largest shows of the year, Homecoming Spectacular, as a service to the university community.  Jennifer Reed directed the show this year. Part of her job is to determine what BYU groups will be in the show. Once that is determined, she works on potential collaborations with BYU groups and headliners.  She will suggest numbers for the groups to sing that seem to go along with a subtle theme.  This year, the subtle theme was, “The light in our lives, happiness and sunshine.” The headliners’ music really determines what direction the show will go. Jennifer was excited to see that vision come together for a very successful show this year. It was the largest Spectacular, selling 20,500 tickets! The audience loved it! When Jennifer originally invited Colbie to headline the show, she realized Colbie didn’t know what she was getting into, but she had a wonderful experience in large part because of our awesome students.  A fun behind the scenes story: Jennifer really wanted to have beach balls drop on the audience during the finale, and it was a bit of a battle to get the Marriott Center to agree. They finally did and dropped over 500 beach balls, which was the perfect end to a fun and uplifting night!  Jennifer is especially grateful to her key collaborators on Spectacular:

  • Marianne Ohran: Lighting Designer
  • Russ Richins: Set Designer and Production Manager
  • Justin Hemsely: Projection Designer
  • Aaron Kopp: Sound Designer
  • Jared Patching: Technical Director
  • Jodi Maxfield: Key Choreographer
  • Bridget Benton: Talent Liasion/Producer

She is extremely appreciative to all the students who helped, without whom the show would not have gone on.  TMA students involved included Sarah Barrus, Kirsten Busse,Grant Porter, Matthew Kupferer, Susan Kupferer,  Dayne Joyner, Christina Porter, Jacob Anderson, Paige Whitaker, and Emma Nulton.  Below is a photo of the Spectacular crew with this year’s show’s stars, Colbie Caillat and David Archuleta.

byu spectacular 2018


Each semester, students put their playwriting and producing skills to the test in creating short plays that exhibit the skills and talents they’ve acquired. Microburst Theatre is a fresh and exciting showcase of those short plays. In a showcase directed by George Nelson, this year’s production will feature six new works which will be shown in the evening from Thursday, October 18 to Saturday, October 20. For tickets and showtimes, click here.

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Bryson Frehner, who is currently the production manager for Divine Comedy, gave this report about the group’s first show of the semester which happened over the weekend:  “The show this last weekend was really fun. The group performed 4 sold out shows of “Mamma Mia Maid” with strong performances, especially considering that there were six new cast members. Fun fact: this year’s Divine Comedy cast has more women than men for the first time ever (6 to 5)! They all felt very comfortable on stage, they all had great moments and they made a lot of people laugh. All the laughter and sketches aside, something that I noticed and loved is how diverse the cast is this year. There’s a great variety in body types, faces, comedic styles and even ethnicity.  I also feel a very positive, unique and fresh vibe from this group, something I don’t think I’ve ever felt or seen. There’s a beautiful sense of unity and camaraderie that is coming through their performances and chemistry with each other. I was really impressed with this first DC show and I am excited to see what more great things come from this group of 11 very talented comedians.”  Newbies this semester include Austin Judkins, Garet Allen (media arts major!), Kiara Mercedes, Kiri Case, McKay Fritz and Naomi Winters.  George Nelson is the TMA faculty liaison for the group with TMA.


Two of our retired faculty Barta Heiner and Janet Swenson currently have shows up in Utah.  Barta directs the current show at the Covey Center, Angel Street, a 1938 script that was made into a well-known film in 1944 under the name Gaslight, which starred Charles Boyer and Ingrid Bergman.  In fact, the term “gaslighting, to cause a person to doubt his or her sanity through the use of psychological manipulation,”  came from the film.  Later, the play was produced on Broadway.  This “Victorian Thriller” plays through Oct. 27. For tickets, click here.

From Utah Theatre Bloggers: “Heiner … helped the actors create strong characters who had years of stories behind them. Every character had depth and a lifetime of experience they carried around with them. Jack had his secrets, Bella had family difficulties, Rough had years of investigative inquiries. Heiner was able to help the actors figure out their stories and avoid two-dimensional characters that would only exist during the scenes they were in.”

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Janet Swenson designed costumes for Tuacahn’s production of Cinderella, which closes on Friday, Oct. 19 of this week.  From Front Row Reviewers, https://frontrowreviewersutah.com/?p=7828 : “I was also immediately taken away by the incredible costumes designed by Janet Swenson. All of the dresses, hats, men’s elaborate suits are appropriate and beautiful. Every member of the cast has exquisite attire the entire show. This show requires some instant onstage costume transformations, which are cleverly and impressively done.  Magic happens right before your eyes, and if you aren’t paying close enough attention, you will miss it.  From rags to riches, Cinderella’s ball gown seems to appear out of nowhere.”

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Alumni News

Recent media arts graduate, Sariah May, who wrote and directed the student capstone film, “I Love My Robot Boyfriend,” has had the film accepted into numerous film festivals.  The most recent one, Citizen Jane, is pretty cool!  They’ll fly her our and treat her like royalty!  Here is a current list of 12 festivals the film has gotten into: Utah Film Festival, LDS Film Festival, Alternative Film Festival (ALTFF), Eye Film Festival, Best Short Fest (semi-finalist), Calcutta International Cult Film Festival, Breaththroughs Film Festival, Lady Filmmakers Film Festival, Cineyouth Film Festival (won best comedy), For Film’s Sake, FilmQuest, and Citizen Jane Film Festival.

 

 

Library Film Series – Frankenstein on October 26

One of the greatest monster movies of all time, the 1931 version of Frankenstein is the source of countless tributes and parodies. Starring Boris Karloff, this is the film that made him a star.

2018 marks the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s novel. There will be several events on campus including a lecture that day in the Library at 3:00 by professors Cutchins and Perry of the English department who will speak on the many adaptations of Frankenstein.

Doors open at 6:00 pm and the film begins at 7:00 pm.

Admission is free.

Library Film Series - Frankenstein.jpg

Department News 10-08-18

BYU’s Center for Animation has garnered two significant awards this year. In May, animation students won E3’s College Game Competition, an important honor in the realm of game animation. Now BYU has been named the top animation program with Bachelor of Science programs by Animation Career Review.  Capitalizing on a co-operative team model that mirrors the top animation studios, the program produces two capstone projects each year, one animated short and one video game.

This cooperative model has led to many College National Emmys and Student Academy awards over the years for the animated shorts.  The video games they have produced have received finalist status in four out of the six years that E3 has held the College Game Competitions — nabbing their first win this year. Alums of the BYU Center of Animation are working in many recognizable studios including Disney, Pixar, DreamWorks and BlueSky.  To watch films, play games and see other work from BYU’s animation students, click here, or to see the full BYU article about the animation program’s recent recognitions, click here.

beat-boxers


Recently, Julia Ashworth, Amy Jensen, and undergraduate student Mariah Eames attended the 5th International Theatre for Children and Young People Researchers and Critics forum in Buenos Aires, Argentina (ITYARN).  The forum took place from September 17-21.  The theme of the forum was “Writing for the new generation, ‘Gen Z,’ ‘iGen’ or ‘Centennials.’ Where is TYA Going?”  Julia Ashworth and Mariah Eames presented on the processes they went through as two white, non-Latina women adapting and directing Romeo y Julieta.  How do you present and invite a minority culture into the dominant one?  They discussed the processes they used to adapt the script and ways they brought Latino voices into the process.

Amy Jensen also presented her research around the theatre students who were victims in the Parkland shooting in Florida and how they presented themselves to the nation via social media. The title of Amy’s work is “No More Thoughts and Prayers: What the Performance of Youth Protest in Real-World and Online Communities Might Tell Us About the Future of Theatre with Young People”, which is about how the online and live protests of young people might help us to see them better as collaborators with us rather than receivers of our work. The case study is about the Parkland student’s public and activist response to the shootings at their school. Closely aligned with ASSITEJ, ITYARN, the research branch of ASSITEJ, is held internationally every three years.  This smaller forum for the Argentine chapter is held every other year.  Paper presentations were in both English and Spanish.  English speakers were provided with headphones. Julia has found the international perspective of these forums, particularly the ASSITEJ conference which focuses more on production, to be invaluable to her in her role as Young Company producer.


This is the last week to go see Young Company’s production of The World’s Strongest Librarian on BYU campus before they continue their tour to elementary schools in the area. The show has had considerable success as well as fun surprise visits from the world’s strongest librarian himself, Josh Hanagarne. Don’t miss out on this heartwarming tale about learning to make friends and love learning. For tickets and showtimes, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audition 2018: Sugar Factory Playhouse – The Gift of the Magi

Sugar Factory Playhouse is pleased to announce auditions for “The Gift of the Magi” by Jon Jory. This heartwarming romantic comedy, narrated by a group of Christmas carolers, tells the story of Della and Jim, who are desperately in love with each other but also very poor. In their attempts to buy each other proper Christmas gifts, a strange twist of fate leads the couple to find the perfect gifts for one another — but at an unexpected cost. Though they may not have the perfect Christmas, the couple learns about the importance of the gift of love in this beautiful adaptation of the story by O. Henry. The play is directed by Karen Chatterton.
All parts are open for actors in their late teens to adults.
Performance dates are December 6 – 17, 2018 at the Midvale Permforming Arts Center.
Audition dates have been set on October 18 and 19 at West Jordan City Hall (8000 South Redwood Road) from 7:00 until 9:00 p.m. Actors may come at any time during the audition dates and times.
Actors will be asked to read sides from the script, which can be downloaded here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1IdxDlZpBxLWQ5AYmI8tElPObxYQ_R30I/view?usp=sharing
The sides do not have to be completely memorized.
Please bring a resume and head shot. Singers should be prepared to sing 16 measures of a Christmas song, no a capella or CDs please; an accompanist will be provided.
CHARACTER ROLES AND DESCRIPTIONS:
  • Jim: (early to mid-20’s) Young man who falls deeply in love with Della. He is unselfish, devoted, and sentimental. He cherishes a watch given to him by his grandfather, which is his prized earthly possession; only Della means more to him.
  • Della: (early to mid-20’s) Young woman who falls deeply in love with Jim. She is modest, cheerful, compassionate, and at times, too critical of herself. She has long, beautiful hair which she sells to buy a gift for her beloved Jim.
  • Digby: (early to mid-20’s) The cavalier and playful friend of Jim. He serves as both facilitator and antagonist to Jim’s better practical self.
  • Dot: (20 to 30 years of age) Sister to Della. She is loving and supportive of her sister.
  • Clarice: (35 to 40 years of age) Neighbor to Della, she has a large family and depends on Della for support and understanding of her desperate situation.
  • Art: (mid 20’s to 40) Jim’s co-worker; acts as a facilitator to the story.
  • Bootman or woman: (mid 20’s to 60 years) Seller of shoes and boots.
  • Shopgirl: (30 to 50 years) Works in a jewelry/watch shop. She is a bit bold and speaks her mind.
  • Madam Vodvaskaya: (45 and older) Mature and experienced Russian woman – dramatic in her actions, bold and brash. She is a comedic character that takes herself very seriously.
  • Woman: (flexible age) Small speaking part, incidental character.
  • Passersby, shoppers, and Christmas choir: men and women of all vocal ranges. Must be able to sing Christmas carols in vocal parts.

National Gallery of Art: Visiting Senior Fellowship Program (2019-2020)

The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts announces its program fro senior fellowships. Fellowships are for full-time research, and scholars are expected to reside in Washington and to participate in the activities of the Center throughout the fellowship period. Lectures, colloquia, and informal discussions complement the fellowship program. Each senior fellow is provided with a study. In addition, visiting senior fellows who relocate to Washington are provided with housing in apartments near the Gallery, subject to availability.

One Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellowships are intended to support research in the history, theory, and criticism of the visual arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape architecture, urbanism, prints and drawings, film, photography, decorative arts, industrial design, and other arts) of any geographical area and of any area. The Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellowships are intended to support research on European art before the early nineteenth century. The William C. Seitz Senior Fellowship is primarily intended to support research on modern and contemporary art. Visiting senior fellowship application are also solicited from scholars in other disciplines who work examines artifacts or has implications for the analysis and criticism of form.

Visiting senior fellowships are intended for those who have held the PhD for 5+ years or more at the time of application, or who possess an equivalent record of professional accomplishment. Individuals currently affiliated with the National Gallery of Art are not eligible for the visiting senior fellowship program.

The Center awards up to twelve short-term (up to 60 days) Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellowships annually. Stipends for 2-month fellowships range from $7,000 to $8,000, depending on relocation requirements; in addition, fellows receive housing, as available.

Applications: Candidates for the visiting senior fellowships program must submit an online application that includes a proposal and a copy of one article or chapter from books, to be submitted on or before the application deadline. Two letters of recommendation are required. Visiting senior fellows may receive awards in three consecutive years but thereafter must wait three years before reapplying to the Center. Individuals may not apply for other Center fellowships while an application is pending or once a fellowship has been awarded. Visiting senior fellowships may not be postponed or renewed.

Award Period: March 1 – August 15, 2019
Deadline: September 21, 2018

Award Period: September 1, 2019 – February 29, 2020
Deadline: March 21, 2019

National Gallery of Art: Senior Fellowship Program (2019-2020)

The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts announces its program fro senior fellowships. Fellowships are for full-time research, and scholars are expected to reside in Washington and to participate in the activities of the Center throughout the fellowship period. Lectures, colloquia, and informal discussions complement the fellowship program. Each senior fellow is provided with a study. In addition, senior fellows who relocate to Washington are provided with housing in apartments near the Gallery, subject to availability.

One Paul Mellon and Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellowships are intended to support research in the history, theory, and criticism of the visual arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape architecture, urbanism, prints and drawings, film, photography, decorative arts, industrial design, and other arts) of any geographical area and of any area. The Samuel H. Kress Senior Fellowships are intended to support research on European art before the early nineteenth century. The William C. Seitz Senior Fellowship is primarily intended to support research on modern and contemporary art. Senior fellowship application are also solicited from scholars in other disciplines who work examines artifacts or has implications for the analysis and criticism of form.

Senior fellowships are intended for those who have held the PhD for 5+ years or more at the time of application, or who possess an equivalent record of professional accomplishment. Individuals currently affiliated with the National Gallery of Art are not eligible for the senior fellowship program.

A senior fellowship award for the academic year is normally limited to 1/2 of applicants salary, up to a maximum of $50,000, depending on individual circumstances. Awards for a single academic term are prorated. Senior fellows also receive allowances for travel to a scholarly conference, in addition to housing, as available.

Applications: Candidates for the senior fellowship program must submit an online application that includes a proposal and a copy of two publications, either articles or chapters from books, to be submitted on or before the application deadline. Three letters of recommendation are required. Procedures for associate appointments are the same as those for the senior fellowship program. Holders of senior fellowships may reapply five years after the completion of the fellowship. Individuals may not apply for other Center fellowships while an application is pending or once a fellowship has been awarded. Senior fellowships may not be postponed or renewed.

Deadline: October 15, 2018